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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

Pinball Restoration

Pinball Restoration includes articles that cover generic topics (apply to all manufacturers) like removing playfield mylar, restoring cabinets, replacing cabinet decals and much more.

 
50 results - showing 41 - 50 1 2 3 4 5
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Cleaning Inside of Cabinet
Cleaning the inside of a pinball cabinet is always a challenge because while this is typically one of the dirtiest areas on any game you need to minimize the amount of water the wood is exposed to. The best solution I've found is to use a foam carpet cleaner. My preference is Resolve High Traffic Foam and a stiff bristle scrub brush. Spray the foam on the inside area of the cabinet and then scrub briskly with the brush. You can use a couple of brush sizes to help reach corners and other hard...
 
 
Removing Cabinet Scuff Marks
It's not uncommon to find scuff marks on your pinball cabinet where paint from a doorway or chair or a brunette with a bad dye job (don't ask) has rubbed off on the cabinet. In many cases you can remove the unwanted paint without damaging the cabinet paint. The key is to go with a mild cleaner. The first step is to evaluate your chances of success. Rub your finger across the scuff mark and you should feel a slightly raised area. If you don't, or you feel gouges when running your...
 
 
Wood Patching Guide
This article is intended to provide general wood patching techniques that will help you to complete cabinet, backbox and playfield repair. Even if you have experience with non-pinball wood repair you will find information and techniques specific to pinball repair in the article. For specific pinball repair examples see the cabinet restoration section or the playfield restoration section. Tools and Supplies The first step is to get your supplies and tools together. I keep several types of wood filler on hand for pinball repair: Elmer's Carpenters Wood Filler, Minwax High Performance...
 
 
Repairing Backbox Corners
Remember that Samsonite commercial where a gorilla jumps up and down on someone's luggage at the airport? I just picked up a Data East Hook pinball that must have been moved from location to location by the same gorilla. Every corner on the backbox was heavily destroyed (see image 1). In addition, on several corners the top layer of plywood was de-laminated (see image 2). Normally if the wood was only slightly de-laminated (as compared to warped out about 1/2 an inch as it was on the Hook) I would use wood glue for...
 
 
Polishing Metal Scoops
The scoop pictured in image 1 shows the normal wear and tear, and ball tracks, that you would expect on a decade old pinball game. While I normally use a bench polisher for metal ramps and guides, for scoops and other odd shaped pieces of metal a Dremel tool works better. The only other tools you need are a couple of buffing wheels and Ryobi yellow and white buffing compounds (see image 2), which are available at Home Depot. The yellow compound is for removing scratches and the white compound is for polishing. I...
 
 
Scoop Repair and Cliffy Protector Installation
Just picked up a Data East Hook pinball with extremely worn scoop holes. Based on the amount of damage, and to help protect the game in the future, I decided to install Cliffy's scoop protectors (see image 1). You can purchase Cliffy protectors direct from Cliffy or through most pinball part suppliers. In image 2 you can see the temporarily installed Cliffy protectors. Note: I just noticed the right Cliffy protector is installed incorrectly. It should be rotated 90 degrees counter-clockwise. The middle scoop has some minor paint wear in the...
 
 
Backbox Restoration
I recently picked up a Terminator 2 that a guy was keeping in his garage. Normally the garage thing would make me walk away, but I really like T2. In my opinion this is one of Steve Ritchie's best games. The problem is that pinball manufacturers don't seem to believe in wood primer and any exposure to moisture or humidity does a real job on the cabinet. In this case the backbox was trashed (see Images 1 and 2). Well, I needed a project at the moment, so what the hell. ...
 
 
Making Pinball Warning Labels
Although often overlooked, if you're going to go to the trouble of restoring a pinball machine I definitely think it is worth taking the time to replace the warning and notice labels. It really makes the machine look like new and the old labels are usually in pretty bad shape. The following procedure will take you through creating new labels from scanning to laminating. See the references for links to warning label files you can download if yours aren't in good enough shape to scan. You can also use this technique for coil wrappers....
 
 
Removing Playfield Mylar
There are three basic methods for removing mylar: the freeze method, the heat method and the chemical method (orange cleaner/degreaser). Each has its own pros and cons and none of the techniques can be guaranteed not to damage whatever is underneath the mylar. I have found the best method for removing playfield mylar is typically the freeze method, which I will cover in this article. Before we start though, I cannot state strongly enough that you risk damaging your playfield artwork with this or any other technique. Although if you follow the steps exactly,...
 
 
Painting Reference
In this article I will try to clarify the confusing world that is paint selection and application. Hopefully by the end you will be able to answer the question of why black is not always black. If you've ever tried to match black paint on a cabinet or backbox you know just what I'm talking about. Let me say up front that some of the terms for types of paint that should be standard, are not. In some cases the usage of the term has changed over time and in other cases it appears...
 
 
 
50 results - showing 41 - 50 1 2 3 4 5