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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

Pinball Restoration

Pinball Restoration includes articles that cover generic topics (apply to all manufacturers) like removing playfield mylar, restoring cabinets, replacing cabinet decals and much more.

 
50 results - showing 31 - 40 1 2 3 4 5
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Removing Mylar Adhesive from Playfield
I've been using the flour method for removing mylar glue residue from a playfield for a while. The included video describes the method in detail. I recently came across a post on Pinside.com that improves on the original method. Rather than alcohol, this method uses Goo Gone Spray Gel. Lightly sprinkle flour over the adhesive residue and then spray Goo Gone over the area. Let it sit for from five to twenty minutes and place some fresh flower at one edge of the area. Then roll the fresh flower over the area...
 
 
Saving Backbox Warning Decal
This is the second part of my cabinet repair on a Williams Terminator 2. The first part is covered in my Backbox Restoration article. Just to quickly bring you up to date, the game was purchased from someone who kept it in a garage and the humidity had completely trashed the backbox. Because of the condition of the backbox warning decal I couldn't use painters tape to mask it off without peeling up chunks of the decal so I had to take a circuitous route to finish and repaint the back. The first step was...
 
 
Replacing Ramp Decals
With a couple of cheap tools and some adhesive tape it's easy to migrate your ramp decals to a new ramp. In Image 1 in the Image Gallery you can see the original ramp from a Hook pinball with a large chunk missing. Sidenote: The right ramp was in the same condition and upon looking closer I found someone had installed over-powered flipper coils. Brilliant! Along with an X-Acto or sharp knife you will need a bray (used to roll out ink) or a wallpaper seam roller. You can use a plastic...
 
 
Making Ramp Flaps
There's nothing worse than a rusty looking ramp flap and it's not always easy to locate a replacement. The good news is that with the right tools, a new ramp flap is pretty easy to make. All you need is some blue spring steel (available at Pinrestore.com) and a Hand Punch Set (see references). See Image 1. After removing the original ramp, use it as a template to cut out a new ramp from the blue spring steel. There are several solutions for cutting spring steel. A grinder with a cut-off...
 
 
Cabinet Touch-Up Paint (Hook)
I recently did a cabinet touch-up on a Data East Hook pinball that required a different technique than I would normally use. In Image 1 you can see a large black smear on the left side of the cabinet front. The black area appears to be a manufacturing defect; either the black color ran or later colors weren't applied properly. Since I needed to cover the black with yellow, which is absolutely the worst color as far as coverage, I decided to first paint the entire area yellow and then come back and redo the...
 
 
Repairing Stripped Screw Holes in Wood
If you work on a pinball game for more than about five minutes you're going to find a stripped screw hole in either the cabinet or the playfield. All you need is some wood glue and a couple of toothpicks to fix this problem (bamboo skewers also work well). It is worth noting, this is the procedure that professional woodworkers use on stripped holes. All you need to do is dip the toothpick in the wood glue and push it into the screw hole until it hits bottom. Then do the same with a...
 
 
Playfield Touch-Up Paint (Hook)
In Image 1 you can see two scoop holes on a Data East Hook that have been patched (see Scoop Repair article). Cliffy Protectors will be installed later to prevent further destruction, but they won't cover all of the damaged area. So it's time for a little touch-up paint. The first, and most critical step is to find a good color match. I typically use enamel hobby paint, as compared to acrylic craft paint, which a lot of other pinball websites recommend. I like the enamel paint because it is glossier, has a...
 
 
Installing Playfield Mylar
Installing playfield mylar is quick and easy and will provide great results as long as you follow a few important steps. The two things that will ruin the job are dirt or air bubbles under the mylar. Although the process is fairly simple, there is some technique involved, so if it's your first time you might want to experiment on something besides your valuable playfield, like a piece of glass or mirror. You can buy pre-cut mylar from several pinball sites or make your own (see the references). Note: See the references for an...
 
 
Cutting Playfield Mylar
Although you can buy mylar in precut shapes (i.e. - circles for the bumpers or half-circles for the kickers) it's really not that hard to cut it yourself. The most basic cutting solution would require an X-Acto knife, t-square (for cutting square pieces) and either circle templates (available at most craft shops) or a variety of cans for cutting various sizes of round mylar. Note: See the references for a link to an article on static cling vinyl which is removable. Since this seemed like an opportunity to buy tools (always a good...
 
 
Refinishing Electroplated Parts
Many pinball games include metal parts that have been electroplated to increase rust resistance. Image 1 shows three electroplated assemblies from a Data East Hook pinball. These parts were originally electroplated using zinc yellow (zinc plating with a yellow chromate coating) and although it's a little difficult to see in the photo the result is a mottled gold color with hints of red, green and occasionally blue. While in most cases the parts are not visible until the machine is opened up, I always clean them when doing a full restoration. Normally chemical cleaners...
 
 
 
50 results - showing 31 - 40 1 2 3 4 5