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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

Pinball Restoration

Pinball Restoration includes articles that cover generic topics (apply to all manufacturers) like removing playfield mylar, restoring cabinets, replacing cabinet decals and much more.

 
50 results - showing 11 - 20 1 2 3 4 5
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Ultimate Playfield Restore - Touch-Up Painting
This is part four of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers paint selection, color matching, using an airbrush and frisket film. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Paint Selection Airbrushing Color Matching Frisket Film Questions and Answers Paint Selection We never use Sharpie pen, Paint Pen, or those little bottles of Testors enamel that you have left over from your Dungeons & Dragons days. All...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Advanced Repair
This is part three of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers advanced repair topics like fixing insert ghosting. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Fixing Insert Ghosting Repairing Gouges Shooter Lane Fixing Insert Ghosting Insert Ghosting is where the clear coat has pulled away from the plastic and now you see the air gap between the back of the clear coat and the face of the insert (see Image 1)....
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Repairing Inserts
This is part two of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers resolving insert problems. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Removing Inserts Sanding Inserts Cleaning Insert Hole Installing Inserts Raising Inserts Insert Decals Questions and Answers Removing Inserts Before we pull an insert out from the playfield, we want to be sure it does not lift any of the surrounding artwork. ...
 
 
Removing Ball Swirl Marks with Magic Eraser
The best way to remove ball swirl marks is with a Magic Eraser and isopropyl alcohol. The magic behind this method is the fact that melamine foam has a structure like fine fiberglass strands that gets down into cracks and removes dirt and grit. The Magic Eraser approach provides a more effective, and safer, method than sanding or polishing. With the latter approaches it is necessary to work the area until the crack has been (pretty much) completely removed. At that point though you will more than likely have also removed playfield artwork. ...
 
 
Repairing Minor Cabinet Damage
I'm always amazed when someone goes to the trouble of doing touch-up paint on a cabinet but doesn't properly prepare the surface (see Image 1). No matter how well you match the paint and gloss, the repair will stand out like a sore thumb if you don't level and smooth the surface. On the other hand, if you've ever tried to repair shallow cabinet damage (a divot) or scratches with wood putty it is not easy and requires fairly aggressive sanding. Which of course we would prefer to avoid in order to preserve the surrounding...
 
 
Matching Paint Colors
There's nothing worse than a game where someone did some touch-up paint and didn't match the paint color very well (see Image 3). While it does take a good eye to match paint colors there are also some tools and techniques available that will make your life easier. See Images 4 and 5 for an example of some touch-up paint I did on the scoop hole on a Data East Hook. General Advice Not to be sexist here, but women are generally much better at matching colors than guys are. ...
 
 
Repairing Minor Planking in Clear Coated Playfield
It's not uncommon to find planking (hairline cracks) in a clear coated playfield, and repairing it can be a challenge. While in some cases there is no choice but to sand down the area and re-paint there are some less intrusive options that we'll explore in this article. Note: This article is specific to clear coated playfields. Planking can be caused by either shrinkage of the wood as the playfield dries out over time or by temperature or humidity changes that cause the wood fibers to swell (raised grain). The result looks like a thin...
 
 
Editing Graphics with Vector Software
Once you've copied a pinball graphic using a camera or scanner (see references for how to do this) it's time to create a final graphic for publishing. While some will skip the editing step, you are going to get a much more professional looking product with a little editing work. For these examples I'm using CorelDraw X6. It has a very slick tool called PowerTRACE for easily converting bitmap images into vector files. Other vector problems like Adobe Illustrator have similar tools or there are free online services that will convert a bitmap graphic...
 
 
Editing Graphics with Bitmap Software
Once you've copied a pinball graphic using a camera or scanner (see references for how to do this) it's time to create a final graphic for publishing. While some will skip the editing step, you are going to get a much more professional looking product with a little work. For these examples I'm using Corel PaintShop Pro X5 (a bitmap, or raster, editing program). It has a very slick tool called Find All Edges which makes the process about 10 times faster than doing it manually (of course you do give up some accuracy). ...
 
 
Recreating Playfield or Cabinet Graphics
This article will walk you through duplicating cabinet or decal graphics using a camera or scanner. Both approaches can be used to create either decals, stencils or silkscreens. Although I should add that you can get a good VuPoint Magic Wand Scanner for under $100 and the scanner method will be more accurate than the camera method. For more info, see Restoring Cabinet Graphics - Overview, which covers the different types of pinball cabinet graphics and provides an overview of the restoration process. Links are then provided to individual articles (like this one) that...
 
 
 
50 results - showing 11 - 20 1 2 3 4 5