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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

Pinball Restoration

Pinball Restoration includes articles that cover generic topics (apply to all manufacturers) like removing playfield mylar, restoring cabinets, replacing cabinet decals and much more.

 
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Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide
Not all playfields need to be restored. If it's a player's game, if there's a single small wear spot by the ball drop or if you simply don't have the required skill set, just leave it alone. There is no shame in having a game that shows its age. Only you can decide if you have the mechanical and artistic skills to tackle a complete playfield restoration. There is also no shame in admitting you don't, but there is in having posts like the following made in regards to your work. "I've got...
 
 
Restoring Cabinet Graphics - Overview
There are several techniques available when restoring damage to cabinet graphics. Which one you use depends on how the graphics where originally applied, the type of damage and the complexity of the graphics. The purpose of this article is to help you decide which is the best approach for your situation and link to the appropriate techniques. This article is oriented towards major graphics repair requiring creating decals or stencils. For repairing cabinet graphics damage by painting with a brush or airbrush see this article. Types of Cabinet Graphics Many...
 
 
Cleaning Pinball Playfield
If you look closely at your playfield your are going to see thousands of tiny scratches. The majority of those scratches were caused by improper cleaning. So when cleaning a playfield we have two goals: get the game clean plus minimize adding any more scratches (which can only be removed through polishing). The first question is what type of cleaning you're doing. If you just picked up the game and it's filthy I would completely strip the playfield and then clean, polish (if necessary) and wax (see the references for polishing and waxing). ...
 
 
Fixing Insert Problems
I was not happy with the peeling, fogged, and delaminating inserts on my Arabian Nights (see Image 1). Most of the inserts were looking pretty bad. Advice on the web usually mentions trying Krazy glue, Varathane, or just redoing the whole playfield with a full restoration. I was not liking those options and noticed when I wiped the playfield with alcohol, the liquid seeped into the crevasses around the insert and made them look great, until the alcohol dried up. Having work experience with UV curable resins, I tried the following method and it...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Clear Coating a Playfield
This is part six of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers the equipment and techniques necessary to apply automotive clear coat to a playfield. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Equipment Playfield Preparation Selecting the Clear Coat Clear Coating the Playfield Questions and Answers Equipment The investment is quite small, as long as you can borrow someone's compressor. Way under $75. You spend $150...
 
 
Whitening Yellowed ABS Plastics
Rather than replace or paint those old yellowed ABS plastics on your game, there is another solution. Using a simplified version of the Retr0Bright technique you can make them look like new. In Images 1 and 2 you can see a typical yellowed shuttle craft from Star Trek the Next Generation. Get a zip lock bag, fill it with 3% hydrogen peroxide and a spoon full of Oxiclean. Mix until the Oxiclean dissolves. Put your part in, make sure it is fully submerged and put it out in the sun (see Image...
 
 
Repainting Cabinet Screens
Nothing worse than a freshly painted cabinet or backbox with a dirty, oxidized screen (see Image 1). The screens were originally zinc coated using a process called hot-dip galvanization. It is possible to have them redone this way, but since most galvanizing shops charge by the bucket it's rather expensive if you only have a couple of pieces. In the case of cabinet and backbox screens a good solution is to use a zinc-rich cold galvanizing compound (you can buy it in a spray can at Home Depot). While you do get a patina...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Getting Started
This is part one of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers removing mylar and evaluating the playfield. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. So lately we have all been seeing these terrible "restored" playfields. Decals lifting under the clear coat, dirt sealed into the shooter lane, too thick coats of clear, water based clear coats with clouding starting to appear, inserts bucking under the clear, no restoration under ramps or slingshots, faded decals under the clear; simply awful work...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Advanced Touch-Up Painting
This is part five of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers decals and airbrushing. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Decals and Airbrushing Painting White Areas Painting Fine Lines Repairing Planking Questions and Answers Decals and Airbrushing Sometimes you have an area of the playfield that can't be cleaned up with the Magic Eraser. Normally, the ME and 99% alcohol cleans out the cracks, leaving...
 
 
Paint Masking
When touching up cabinets or playfields with an airbrush, LPHV or rattle can, half the battle is masking off the area you don't want to paint. There are several options available and depending on the task at hand you can pick the one that works best (see Image 1). Note: Although these solutions have light adhesive (other than static cling vinyl) they can still lift paint on older games, so be careful. Tools The first thing you need is an X-Acto knife or scalpel with a fresh blade (always use a new...
 
 
 
50 results - showing 1 - 10 1 2 3 4 5