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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

Pinball 101

Pinball 101 includes articles that cover basic topics like buying a pinball, annual maintenance, how to open the backbox and more.

 
8 results - showing 1 - 8
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Pinball Buyers Guide
So you've decided to buy your first pinball. Most people enter this process with both excitement and some trepidation. We've put together the following articles to guide you through the process and hopefully make buying your first pinball both fun and successful. Deciding What Pinball Game to Buy This guide will walk you through the five factors you should evaluate to determine which type of game you should buy. What's a Pinball Worth This guide will point you toward the resources for general pinball pricing. In addition the...
 
 
Online Resources
There are a lot of online resources available to pinballers. Here's a list of some of my favorites. Pinball Parts and Supplies The top three pinball parts sources are: Pinball Life, Marco Specialties and Bay Area Amusements. They are located respectively in the Midwest, East Coast and West Coast. Marco Specialties has the largest selection, Pinball Life tends to be the cheapest and Bay Area Amusements website is difficult to navigate. While all of the three sites mentioned above sell LED's I also like Cointakers. Pin Restore is...
 
 
Deciding What Pinball Game to Buy
The first two questions you need to answer before buying a pinball game are what is your budget and what type of game are you looking for. This article is intended to help you make the best choice, especially if this is your first pinball. The areas you need to consider are: maintenance, game play, theme, condition and budget. Maintenance The first thing to consider before buying a pinball game is they are aged, electromechanical devices that have been in tough environments and typically not maintained well. You will need to...
 
 
Buying a Pinball
You've decided which game(s) you're interested in (see Deciding What Pinball Game to Buy), come up with a budget (see What's a Pinball Worth) and now you're ready to buy your first pinball. Not so fast though, if you haven't really read the two aforementioned articles, do that first. If you have, let's get started. Finding a Pinball Your first challenge is to find the pinball you want, in good condition and for a reasonable price. If that sounds easy, it's not. This is really a case of where you need...
 
 
What's a Pinball Worth?
Well... it depends. A good analogy is classic cars. All of the following affect the value of a classic car: the manufacturer, the model, the era of the car, the quantity made and the car's condition. The same goes for pinball games. Some rare games go for over $15,000 while many fun solid-state games in average condition can be picked up for around $1,000. Games with DMD's are generally considered to be move valuable than a game made a year earlier with digital displays. 1990's era games, and newer, tend to be...
 
 
EOS (End of Stroke) Switch
Most modern pinballs, up until about 1991, use an end of stroke, or EOS, switch on the flipper solenoid. The purpose of this switch is to reduce the current to a flipper when it is held in the up position. Like when you're cradling a ball in the flipper. If high current was maintained for a long period, either the fuse would blow or the driver transistor or coil would burn out. Most EOS switches are normally open and then close when the flipper is in the up position. Some, like the Sega...
 
 
Shop Job
In the old days, a shop job to a route guy meant a quick cleaning and waxing (using a cleaner/waxer) and a basic verification that the machine was working enough to make money. The tech was typically expected to complete about three to four of these in a day. Nowadays, there is a lot of confusion in regards to the definition of a shop job. So be wary when you buy a pinball that has supposedly been shopped. A good shop job will cost $200-600* and takes, on average, 16 hours. On the...
 
 
VUK (Vertical Up-Kicker)
A VUK, or vertical up-kicker, is used in pinball games to--wait here it comes--kick the ball up. In most cases the pinball will enter a saucer (a circular area just slightly lower than the playfield) and the VUK will fire, either immediately or upon some other sequence being completed. The pinball will be kicked up and typically through a wireform, and in the following example out the skeletons mouth (see Images 1 - 3 from a Data East Hook). The other use of VUK's is when a ball has gone below the playfield and...
 
 
 
8 results - showing 1 - 8