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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

 
145 results - showing 31 - 40 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 7 15 »
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WPC Board Versions
The purpose of this document is to provide info on all of the WPC board versions manufactured by Williams and used in Bally/Williams games. There are three generations of WPC boards: WPC-89, WPC-S (security) and WPC-95. The following versions are subsets of the WPC-89 family: WPC Alphanumeric, WPC Dot Matrix, WPC Fliptronics and WPC DCS. All boards within the WPC-95 generation are interchangeable. Some, but not all WPC-89 boards are interchangeable (details provided below). WPC-89 boards and WPC-95 boards are not interchangeable. The A-XXXXX numbers provided for boards in this article...
 
 
Testing WPC CPU on the Bench
With a little knowledge and equipment it's possible to test just about every circuit on a WPC-89, WPC-S or WPC-95 board on the bench. This article will walk you through setting up a simple test fixture and testing the CPU board. Keep in mind that replacing circuit board components requires advanced soldering skills and proper equipment. While this article is intended to cover all WPC era CPU boards (WPC-89, WPC-S and WPC-95), there may be some minor differences between generations. For example, position of the component/connector on the board or different...
 
 
Repairing Plated Through-Holes
It is not uncommon to find damaged plated through-holes when repairing a pinball circuit board. There are two techniques commonly used to repair this type of damage: solder stitch or eyelets. First we'll look at analyzing the damage and then review the repair options. Analyzing the Damage Image 1 provides a side view of the plated through-hole. The through-hole is actually one physical part and the board trace a second physical part. They are electrically connected once the board is wave-soldered. It is fairly common for the connection to break right...
 
 
Pinball Specific Test Equipment
Here's a few pinball specific pieces of test equipment that come in handy whether you work on a lot of games or prefer something safer than jumpering your boards. These products work well when testing a circuit board in-game, but really shine when testing a board on the bench. Clockwise in the image from the upper left: Solenoid Circuit Tester, Special Solenoid Input Tester, Switch Matrix Tester, Opto Tester and Lamp Matrix Tester. All except the Opto Tester, which is available from Pinbits, are available from Siegecraft. Prices range from $8-$20. ...
 
 
Unicatch Long Nose Stapler
The best stapler solution I've found for redoing ground braids and other pinball tasks is the Unicatch Long Nose Stapler.  The long nose allows you to get into tight spots like bumper leads and under-playfield wiring.  Requires an air compressor providing 60 PSI and .36 CFM. Pinrestore.com sells both the silver and copper staples, for this gun, that are used on most modern pinballs.
 
 
Repainting Cabinet Screens
Nothing worse than a freshly painted cabinet or backbox with a dirty, oxidized screen (see Image 1). The screens were originally zinc coated using a process called hot-dip galvanization. It is possible to have them redone this way, but since most galvanizing shops charge by the bucket it's rather expensive if you only have a couple of pieces. In the case of cabinet and backbox screens a good solution is to use a zinc-rich cold galvanizing compound (you can buy it in a spray can at Home Depot). While you do get a patina...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Getting Started
This is part one of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers removing mylar and evaluating the playfield. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. So lately we have all been seeing these terrible "restored" playfields. Decals lifting under the clear coat, dirt sealed into the shooter lane, too thick coats of clear, water based clear coats with clouding starting to appear, inserts bucking under the clear, no restoration under ramps or slingshots, faded decals under the clear; simply awful work...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Advanced Touch-Up Painting
This is part five of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers decals and airbrushing. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Decals and Airbrushing Painting White Areas Painting Fine Lines Repairing Planking Questions and Answers Decals and Airbrushing Sometimes you have an area of the playfield that can't be cleaned up with the Magic Eraser. Normally, the ME and 99% alcohol cleans out the cracks, leaving...
 
 
Paint Masking
When touching up cabinets or playfields with an airbrush, LPHV or rattle can, half the battle is masking off the area you don't want to paint. There are several options available and depending on the task at hand you can pick the one that works best (see Image 1). Note: Although these solutions have light adhesive (other than static cling vinyl) they can still lift paint on older games, so be careful. Tools The first thing you need is an X-Acto knife or scalpel with a fresh blade (always use a new...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Touch-Up Painting
This is part four of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers paint selection, color matching, using an airbrush and frisket film. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Paint Selection Airbrushing Color Matching Frisket Film Questions and Answers Paint Selection We never use Sharpie pen, Paint Pen, or those little bottles of Testors enamel that you have left over from your Dungeons & Dragons days. All...
 
 
 
145 results - showing 31 - 40 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 7 15 »