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Pinball Rehab

pinball repair and restoration

 
145 results - showing 21 - 30 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 7 15 »
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Board Rework Standards
While it's not always feasible for a hobbyist to adhere to industry standards in regards to board rework, it is a good idea to understand those standards. Plus, in many cases its not any harder, or more expensive, to repair a board to the IPC standards. IPC (The Institute for Printed Circuits) is the generally accepted standard for printed circuit board rework. While their standards documents would cost several thousand dollars to purchase, there is an alternative. Circuit Medic has an online guidebook that covers all aspects of board repair and adheres...
 
 
Replacement Two-Color Wiring
When replacing pinball wiring, or adding wiring for a mod, it's best practice to match the original wire colors.  Unfortunately the combination you need is not always easy to find, so here's a few suggestions. A local electrical distributor will often have a selection of wire sizes and colors. Bay Area Amusements carries a selection of colored wires. You can pick up a playfield wiring harness for just a few bucks and then you'll have a wide selection of choices readily at hand.
 
 
Circuit Board Updates
While I'm not a huge proponent of upgrading circuit boards (in most cases I find very little benefit versus the risk of damaging the board), but there are a few updates that are definitely worth doing. WPC DCS On your DCS sound board remove C37 and C45. This will help dramatically with the sound quality. The difference on games like Demo Man is dramatic. Williams did the same modification on later WPC 95 AV boards. WPC Power Driver Board If you experience the flipper enable relay (on the power...
 
 
Craftsman Digital Level
The Craftsman Digital Torpedo Level ($32 at Sears) is the best solution I've found for leveling pinball games.  The LCD digital screen gives you an exact measurement for setting the playfield slope and it also has an audible tone every 45 degrees.  This latter feature is nice when leveling your game from side to side without constantly getting up and down. It even comes with a nice carrying case.
 
 
Micro-Blasting Circuit Boards
The two primary reasons for micro-abrasive blasting a pinball circuit board are to remove the green solder mask (commonly, but mistakenly, called the conformal coating) or clean-up oxidation (see Images 1 and 2). In the past this would have been done with chemicals, but due to regulatory and cost issues, micro-abrasive blasting has now become the standard solution. The problem with a mechanical approach is that ESD (electrostatic discharge) is created, which can damage board components. In production environments specifically designed micro-abrasive blasters are used that minimize ESD. Unfortunately with a price tag...
 
 
Rustproofing Metal Parts
While we all like nice shiny metal pinball parts when restoring a pinball, once a part has been abraded it will rust faster than a new part. In the case of coated parts (for example, zinc-coated) they will rust fairly quickly once the coating is removed. Of course it 's best to have coated parts re-coated, but in some situations it just doesn't make economical sense. In other cases where the part was not coated from the factory, a rustproofing, or rust prevention, solution will provide protection while maintaining an original look. ...
 
 
Ultimate Playfield Restore - Clear Coating a Playfield
This is part six of a six part series on doing a high-end playfield restoration. This article covers the equipment and techniques necessary to apply automotive clear coat to a playfield. For an overview of the process see the Ultimate Playfield Restoration Guide. Equipment Playfield Preparation Selecting the Clear Coat Clear Coating the Playfield Questions and Answers Equipment The investment is quite small, as long as you can borrow someone's compressor. Way under $75. You spend $150...
 
 
Whitening Yellowed ABS Plastics
Rather than replace or paint those old yellowed ABS plastics on your game, there is another solution. Using a simplified version of the Retr0Bright technique you can make them look like new. In Images 1 and 2 you can see a typical yellowed shuttle craft from Star Trek the Next Generation. Get a zip lock bag, fill it with 3% hydrogen peroxide and a spoon full of Oxiclean. Mix until the Oxiclean dissolves. Put your part in, make sure it is fully submerged and put it out in the sun (see Image...
 
 
Electronics Tutorial - Reading Schematics
This is part six of a seven part series intended to provide a basic knowledge of electronics, test equipment, service manuals and troubleshooting in order to allow the reader to effectively repair pinball games. Whether you're troubleshooting a circuit or testing your work after replacing an IC, knowing how to read a schematic is a necessity. While you don't need to become a EE, you should be able to walk through a circuit and understand what components are involved and what connects to what. In addition, you should also be able to look at a...
 
 
Electronic Component Substitution
Some of the electronic components for repairing pinball games are getting hard to find. This article provides information on using replacement parts when the original is not available. I have also listed some components where you can still purchase the original part, but it is best to upgrade to a beefier component. The following Stern document, Component Cross Reference, provides NTG, ECG and Radio Shack part numbers for commonly used components. These are not recommended replacements but direct replacements. In some cases, as noted below, a more robust solution is recommended. ...
 
 
 
145 results - showing 21 - 30 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 7 15 »